The FOOT BOOK

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Published 1968 by Random House

SUMMARY:

This book is short enough that I can actually just type out the entire thing here.

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 “Left foot, Left foot
Right foot, Right.
Feet in the morning.
Feet at night.
Left foot, Left foot, Left foot, Right.
Wet foot, Dry foot.
High foot, Low foot.

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Front feet, Back feet.
Red feet, Black feet.
Left foot, Right foot.
Feet, Feet, Feet.
How many, many
feet you meet.

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Slow feet, Quick feet.
Trick feet, Sick feet.
Up feet, Down feet.
Here come clown feet.
Small feet, Big feet.
Here come pig feet.
His feet, Her feet.
Fuzzy fur feet.

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In the house,
and on the street
how many, many
feet you meet.
Up in the air feet,
Over a chair feet.
More and more feet
Twenty-four feet
Here come
more and more…………..
……….and more feet!
Left foot. Right foot.
Feet. Feet. Feet.
Oh, how many
feet you meet!”

HISTORY:

There is no dedication. This is the first book that Seuss wrote after his first wife, Helen’s, death and before he married his second wife, Audrey. It was written in the winter of 1967 while he was dealing with the financial and business gaps that Helen’s death left behind, and while Audrey divorced her first husband so she could marry Seuss.

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This is also the first of the Bright and Early Books which were written for a “pre-reader” audience. It has even less words than Cat in the Hat which was written on a bet that Seuss couldn’t use only 50 words to write a book. He won the bet for Cat in the Hat and in this book used only 46 words total (including small words like a, the, and, at, etc.) If you omit the small words he used only 34 vocabulary words!

The Bright an Early Board Book cover adds the quote “Dr. Seuss’s Wacky Book of Opposites”, which is true for the most part and is most likely simplified on the inside to only include the parts that are opposites like “up feet, down feet,” and “wet foot, dry foot,” etc. The board books cut out chunks of the stories so it probably doesn’t have moments like “here come clown feet” or “fuzzy fur feet.” They also chose to make the colors on he book opposite to what they original were, with a green back ground and white text instead of the other way around.

The candy-cane spine cover went for a completely different look with the “front feet, back feet” creature instead of our narrator that we see start and end the book on the inside.

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FAVORITE IMAGE:
This isn’t quite the full page, but I really enjoy the image of lots and lots of feet crossing the pages toward the narrator. Very fun and colorful.

foot book

FAVORITE QUOTE:

“In the house,
and on the street,

How many, many
feet you meet.”

The purpose of the book is to teach very young children very simple vocabulary, but I like the idea of a subtle message suggesting that the feet represent the different types of people we meet in life and how they’re all interesting and worth learning about.

Thanks for reading,

Jack St.Rebor

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6 comments on “The FOOT BOOK

  1. Mark Carter says:

    It might be a minor book in the canon, but it justifies its existence for some of the illustrations and the phrase “fuzzy fur feet”, don’t you think?
    “Fuzzy fur feet” – I can’t stop saying it!

  2. Bella says:

    I know that I am 12 but I still love this book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. Kaitlin Larson says:

    I’m 14 and read this to the children I babysit. I love it and they love it.

  4. lolek says:

    Thanks for posting this. I’d offer for your consideration: “Wet foot, dry foot; Low foot, high foot.”

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